The Groundwater Project
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An Evolving Platform for Groundwater Learning

Why is the Groundwater Project Important?

Humanity faces unprecedented challenges today. Our rapidly growing population and the demand for higher living standards are putting enormous pressure on our planet. Abundant and clean freshwater resources have been taken for granted, and groundwater, being invisible to human eyes, is a particular case in point. Many people have the misconception that the groundwater supply is infinite. This profound unawareness of the origin and fate of groundwater, compounded by our increasing appetite to withdraw more groundwater and the need to dispose of more waste, is the cause of rapidly growing problems associated with groundwater quantity and quality. Examples of groundwater over-exploitation and contamination appear in the news media nearly every day. 

In writing the GW-Project, we tell the readers what we know as scientists. The imbalance of the inputs and outputs of our natural resources over time is an important concept, but it has been a privileged knowledge for the few with education in earth history. This should not be the case. If more world citizens can grasp this concept, the potential for conservative management will be higher. A mission of the GW-Project is to raise the next generation to understand: where our water resources come from; that life on Earth depends on those resources; and how precious the resources are simply because it took so very long for them to become what they are today.

The fields of groundwater management, assessment, and remediation technologies were extensively developed during the past decades and are now available to help create a better environment for future generations. The GW-Project is aimed at raising awareness of this problem, but most importantly, it aims to educate citizens on how to best adjust their behavior to prevent the damages produced by lack of knowledge. One of the most important aspects of the GW-Project is to provide better training for technicians, professionals, and scientists to more adequately maintain the health of the planet. 

With the goal of educating the world citizens, the GW-Project is aimed at a global readership by presenting topics that are important not only to affluent countries but also to developing nations in the most remote corners of the planet. Chapters issued first in English will be translated quickly to several other languages so that the knowledge provided by the GW-Project will reach nearly all parts of the globe that have internet access via computers and mobile phones.